About

Save Our Great Salt Lake is a group of organizers, artists, business owners, and concerned citizens working together to prevent ecosystem collapse at the Great Salt Lake. We’re here to educate and engage our community to spark grassroots action and ensure legislative action is taken to save our great lake. 

Our Mission

  • Reduce water diversion at the lake. The Great Salt Lake is being drained by over-consumption. Addressing this will require a major shift in how water is allocated as well as perceptions of the lake. According to Dr. Wayne A. Wurtsbaugh at USU’s Watershed Sciences/Ecology Center: “Reductions in water use from all sectors will be needed if we are to solve this problem.”
  • Oppose the Bear River Development Project. The proposal to divert the river upstream of the lake would cost taxpayers in the billions and dry up tens of thousands of acres of the West’s largest remaining wetland ecosystem.
  • Offer a lower water rate to farmers growing food for Utahns. Roughly 80% of all Utah’s water is used for agriculture with a significant portion going toward alfalfa (used as cattle fodder), which is then sold on the global market. Our water supply is being exported for profit, while nearly 12% of our growing population experiences food insecurity.
  • Enforce water metering and water usage reports from developers. Metering is a simple and immediate way to monitor consumption and encourage conservation. And with Utah’s population set to double in coming decades, new developments must meet critical housing needs and responsibly, sustainably source water.
  • Eliminate hidden taxes paid to water districts and adjust water pricing to reflect true cost. The price of water is kept artificially low by property tax subsidies, yet some of the highest water users like schools, churches, and municipal golf courses pay no property tax, putting the burden of cost on working families. Utah has some of the cheapest water in America and the highest rate of municipal use, despite our desert climate and years-long drought. It’s time for sensible, more sustainable water policy and practices.

© Save Our Great Salt Lake. All rights reserved.